Human Rights and the “War on Terror”: Holding the United States Accountable in Foreign Jurisdictions

February 24, 2017, 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Furman Hall, 326
245 Sullivan Street
New York, NY 10012

Please RSVP here and bring ID to access NYU building.
This event is free and open to the NYU community.
Hosted by PILC and CHRGJ
Pizza will be served!

About the event

Please join the Public Interest Law Center and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice for a lunch discussion on efforts to seek legal accountability for United States counterterrorism practices, including torture, rendition, Guantánamo detention, and drone strikes. Particular attention will be paid to advocacy strategies in jurisdictions outside the United States.

Mr. Akbar will speak about his work in Pakistani and U.K. courts on behalf of civilians killed by U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan, as well as his representation of victims of renditions and Pakistani citizens in Guantánamo. Mr. Schüller will speak about litigation strategies in Europe, including universal jurisdiction, supporting former Guantánamo detainees through cases in their European home countries, and using administrative lawsuits before a German court.

About the speakers

Shahzad Akbar is a barrister at Lincoln’s Inn, a fellow in Reprieve’s Pakistan office, and the founder of the Foundation for Fundamental Rights in Islamabad, an organization that works towards the advancement, protection and enforcement of fundamental human rights in Pakistan. Mr. Akbar has represented more than 130 families who have lost loved ones in U.S. drone strikes. Outside of Pakistan, his work has also led to landmark litigation before the U.K. High Court regarding potential U.K. intelligence sharing. In addition, he also represents Pakistanis in Guantánamo, victims of enforced disappearances and renditions, and those on death row.

Andreas Schüller joined the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR) in 2009 and directs its International Crimes and Accountability Program. He graduated from law school in Trier (Germany), studied in Orléans (France), and holds an LL.M. degree in Public International Law and International Criminal Law from Leiden University (Netherlands). His docket also includes work that addresses U.K. torture in Iraq and war crimes in Sri Lanka and Syria.