Human Rights Defenders Series Presents—“Nothing to Hide: New Tactics on Surveillance and Technology for Human Rights Activists” with Becky Hurwitz

October 29, 2013, 1:00pm - 2:00pm

139 MacDougal St, 5th Floor Conference Room (CHRGJ)

RSVP and valid ID required for this event. Please RSVP to Audrey Watne at watnea@exchange.law.nyu.edu by Monday October 28th. Lunch will be served.

About the Event: As part of its ongoing “Human Rights Defenders Series” CHRGJ is very pleased to have Becky Hurwitz join us to discuss her work, which is situated at the intersection between media/new technologies, human rights, and social change.

Over lunch, Becky will discuss two workshops she and fellow anti-surveillance activists have been facilitating and sharing in Oakland, NYC and Boston — “ICU” surveillance camera mapping with mobile phones designed to raise awareness about the ubiquity of surveillance equipment and to engage people in dialogue around power and control expressed through the use of this equipment; and “But I have nothing to hide” a role-playing exercise that invites participants to construct the identity of a targeted person using information publicly available online.  These workshops are the collaborative creation of a group of media makers, techies, and activists including Emi Kane (Allied Media Projects), Jesse Strauss (Coalition for Justice for Oscar Grant), Mark Burdett (EFF), Salima Hamirani, Seeta Gangadharan (OTI), Sarah Reilly (Design Action Collective).

This work is meant to help bridge the gaps between policy, technology, and social movement spaces, all of which are involved in their own, often siloed conversations about surveillance. We also hope to locate recent conversations about NSA surveillance in the broader context of social movement history, focusing on the histories and experiences of poor people and communities of color.

About our speaker: Becky is the Codesign Facilitator and Community Organizer at the MIT Media Lab’s Center for Civic Media and a member of Research Action Design Collective (RAD).  She spends her time with changemakers of many kinds codesigning tools and methods to leverage media and technology for equitable social change. Prior to joining the Center, she led the SaferMobile project at MobileActive, a program to educate and train activists, journalists, and human rights defenders in mobile phone security.  An activist and a journeyer, Becky has lived domestically and internationally working in the field of communication technology design and as a photographer. She is particularly dedicated to the demystification of technology and the democratization of technology creation and use. Becky holds a B.S. in Comparative Media Studies from MIT and an M.S. in Information Management and Systems from the UC Berkeley iSchool.