ICYMI: CHRGJ Alum Nathan Wessler on Democracy Now: “Supreme Court Says Warrants Needed to Search Cellphones, But are ‘Stingrays’ a Police Workaround?”

The Supreme Court delivered a resounding victory for privacy rights in the age of smartphones Wednesday when it ruled unanimously that police must obtain a warrant before searching the cellphones of people they arrest. The ruling likely applies to other electronic devices, such as laptop computers, which, like cellphones, can store vast troves of information about a person’s private life. The ruling makes no reference to the National Security Agency and its vast web of cellphone spying. But some NSA critics say it signals a greater understanding by the court of today’s technology and its implications for privacy. We get reaction to the ruling from Nathan Freed Wessler, staff attorney with the Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. He also discusses police use of “Stingray” spy devices, which mimic cell towers and intercept data from all cellphones in a certain radius.

Read more and watch the video here.