Past Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conferences

12th Annual Emerging Scholarship Conference (April 17, 2015)

The Twelfth Annual Emerging Scholarship Conference was held on April 17, 2015. The commentators were Chris Albin-Lackey (Human Rights Watch), Muzaffar Chishti (NYU, Migration Policy Institute), Zama Coursen-Neff (Human Rights Watch), Allison Corkery (Center for Economic and Social Rights), Eduardo Gonzalez (International Center for Transitional Justice), Ryan Goodman (NYU, CHRGJ), Sally Merry (NYU, CHRGJ),Nikki Reisch (CHRGJ),  Margaret Satterthwaite (NYU, CHRGJ), Darian Pavli (Open Society Justice Initiative), Marlon Weichert (CHRGJ), Daniel Wilkinson (Human Rights Watch), John Wunderlin (Carbon Tracker), and Marcos Zunino (CHRGJ).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Emily Buist-Catherwood (LLM) Enforcing the Right to Education: Military Presence and the GCPEA Guidelines
  • Oliver Persey (LLM) Greening the Targeting Process in International Armed Conflicts: The Potential Impact of Environmental Human Rights Law on International Humanitarian Law
  • Jay Shooster (JD ’16) Unalienable: The Human Right to Immigrate and the End of Extreme Poverty
  • Allie Wilson (JD ’16) From Freedom of Information to a Right to Information: An Economic Rights Perspective
  • Harry Hobbs (LLM) Locating the Logic of Transitional Justice in Liberal Democracies: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Rights in Australia        
  • Edefe Ojomo (LLM) Counterbalancing Peoples’ Rights and Persons’ Rights: Distilling a Nigerian Constitutional Construction of Rights
  • Sumeya Mulla (LLM) Economic, Social & Cultural Rights: Is There a Role for International Criminal Law?
  • Natalia Restrepo-Ortiz (LLM) Transitional Justice in Colombia: Is Law 1448 of 2011 (Victims’ Law) enough?

CHRGJ awarded its 2015 Global Justice Emerging Scholar Essay Prize for the best paper on human rights to Oliver Persey.

11th Annual Emerging Scholarship Conference (March 27, 2014)

The Eleventh Annual Emerging Scholarship Conference was held on March 27, 2014. The commentators were Philip Alston (NYU, CHRGJ), Ira Belkin (NYU, US-ALI), Ioana Cismas (CHRGJ), Brian Dooley(Human Rights First), Cynthia Estlund (NYU), Sumit Galhotra (Committee to Protect Journalists), Ryan Goodman(NYU, CHRGJ), Amanda Klasing (Human Rights Watch), Isabelle Lassée (CHRGJ), Christopher McCrudden(Michigan Law, Queens University, NYU Straus Institute), Félix Reátegui (International Center for Transitional Justice), Margaret Satterthwaite (NYU, CHRGJ), Karla Torres (Center for Reproductive Rights).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Ashley Fernandez (JD ’15),The Arab Spring: A New Season for Self-Determination 
  • Alvin Cheung (LLM), Road to Nowhere: Hong Kong’s Democratisation and China’s Obligations under Public International Law
  • Rebecca Sheff (JD ’15), Operationalizing the Best Interests Principle in India’s Child Protection System
  • Sarah Macrory (LLM), Closing Global Governance Gaps?  Regulatory Responses to the Rana Plaza Factory Collapse in Bangladesh of April 2013
  • Lisa Sangoi (JD ’15), A Human Rights Critique of the Use of the Chemical Endangerment Statute in Alabama to Prosecute Pregnant Women for their Drug Use
  • Alyson Zureick (JD ’14), (En)gendering Suffering: Denial of Abortion as a Form of Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment
  • Sam Burke (LLM), Searching for the Right to Truth: The Impact of International Human Rights Law on National Transitional Justice Policies
  • Anji Manivannan (JD ’14), Ending Black January: Opening Political Spaces for the Media to Enact Creative Transitional Justice in Sri Lanka

CHRGJ awarded its 2014 Global Justice Emerging Scholar Essay Prize for the best paper on human rights to Alyson Zureick.

Tenth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 12, 2013)

The Tenth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 22, 2011. The commentators were Professors Philip Alston (NYU/CHRGJ), Margaret Satterthwaite (NYU/CHRGJ), Paul van Zyl (NYU/CHRGJ), Adam Cox (NYU), Vasuki Nesiah (NYU), and Ira Rubinstein (NYU) as well as Laura Bingham (OSJI), Kate Cronin-Furman (Columbia), Sarah Knuckey (CHRGJ/NYU), Kelli Muddell (ICTJ), Faiza Patel (Brennan Center/NYU), Christopher Rogers (OSJI), Armin von Bogdandy (Max Planck Institute), Ben Wizner (ACLU).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Olivier Barsalou, The Diplomacy of the Universal: The Cold War and the Rise of an American Conception of Human Rights, 1945-1948
  • Mateya Beth Kelley, Human Rights & Refugee Claims by Stateless Persons: A Curse and A Blessing
  • Emily Kenney, Developing a Gender Methodology for the UN Commission of Inquiry
  • Merryl Lawry-White, The Reparative Effect of  Truth Seeking in Transitional Justice: Means and Ends
  • Anjali Manivannan, Seeking Justice for Male Victims of Sexual Violence
  • Carey Shenkman, A Shock Value Defense for New Media: Rethinking Protections for the Fact-Finders of U.S. Government Misconduct in the National Security Age
  • Alex Sinha, NSA Surveillance since 9/11 and the Human Right to Privacy
  • Matthew Craig, Procedure, Targeted Killing, and the Risk of Legitimation

CHRGJ awarded its 2013 Global Justice Emerging Scholar Essay Prize for the best paper on human rights to Emily Kenney.

Ninth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (March 29 – April 2, 2012)

The Ninth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held from March 29 until April 2, 2012. The commentators were Claire Kelly, Melanie Samson, Jasper Finke, Robert Howse, Damian Chalmers, Seyla Benhabib, Freidl Weiss, Richard Stewart, Lorenzo Casini, Gráinne de Búrca, Bryce Rudyk, Krisztina Huszti Orban, Sarah Knuckey, Kevin Davis, Georgios Dimitropoulos, Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen, Tai-Heng Cheng, Yasmine Ergas, Philip Alston, Megan Donaldson, Ruti Teitel, Faiza Patel, Alexander Greenawalt, John Washburn, Allain Maillot, Francesca Romanin-Jacur, Dean Bialek, Christen Broecker.

The following student papers were presented:

  •  Sam Litton (JD), “US-Tuna and the Hardening of International Soft Law”
  • Karen Leovy (JSD), “The Inter-Jurisdictional Containment of Natural Disasters – The Case of Managing Cyclone Nargis (Myanmar, 2008)”
  • Guy Sinclair (JSD), “To Reform the World: Law, Legitimacy, and the Expanding Powers of International Organizations”
  • Julian Arato (LLM), “Treaty Interpretation and Constitutional Transformation: ‘Subsequent Practice’ as a Mode of Informal Change in International Organizations”
  • Ben Heath (LLM), “Humanitarian Coordination as Administrative Power: The Intertwined Histories of the United Nations and the International Organization for Migration”
  • Elizabeth Hassan (LLM), “Accountability Deficit of Specialized International Agencies and the Challenges Posed to Global Administrative Law”
  • Elena Lobo (JD), “Meeting at the Margins – The Margin of Appreciation in the European Court of Human Rights: A Dialogue Between International and National, Privacy and the Paparazzi”
  • Carson Thomas (JD), “Advancing the Legal Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict: Interpreting Protocol I’s Threshold of Impermissible Environmental Damage” 4:30 pm – Hannah Bloch-Webha (JD), “Global Governance in the Information Age: The Terrorist Finance Tracking Program”
  • Thomas Earnest (JD), “(Re)Developing Targeted Killings as a Neutral Principle?”
  • Matt Craig (JD), “Responding with Appropriate Procedures to Concerns Raised by U.S. Targeted Killing Practices”
  • Adria Gulizia (JD), “Substance, Form and Power in the Financial Action Task Force: A GAL Case Study”
  • G. Alex Sinha (JD), “Mitigating the Twofold Tragedy of Child Soldiers: Uncovering Super-Privileged Combatants in the Geneva Conventions”
  • Aneesa Walji (LLM), “Vicitms or Terrorists? Child Soldiers in Canadian Refugee Law”
  • Nikki Reisch (JD), Resolving the Rights- Responsibility Imbalance in International Investment Law: Is ‘Arbitrating Human Rights’ the Answer?”
  • Amos Toh (LLM), “Revisiting the Universality of Human Rights”
  • Salona Lutchman (LLM), “Should South African law allow a child to sue its drug-addicted mother for harm inflicted in utero? An analysis of South Africa’s obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989”
  • Roberto Chenal (LLM), “Justiciability of the Rights to Food and Water and the Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights”
  • Jessey Freeman (LLM), “Using Australian Tort Law to Respond to Resident Human Rights Violators”
  • Christopher Roberts (JD), “Individual Rights and the Illegality of Amnesties Under International Law”
  • Valerie Brender (JD), “A Private War: the Forced Labor of Migrant Workers Employed by Private U.S. Military Logistics Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan”
  • Catarina Prata (LLM) “Connecting the Dots: Law on State Responsibility and Private Military and Securities Companies – Questions of Attribution”
  • Kaveri Vaid (JD), “Sovereignty Enforced is not Sovereignty Undermined: The ICC’s Same-Case Complementarity Requirement”
  • Carey Shenkman (JD) “Catalyzing National Judicial Capacity – The ICC’s First Crimes Against Humanity Outside Armed Conflict”
  • Jonathan Cardenas (JD), “Deal-Jumping in CrossBorder Merger & Acquisition Negotiations: A Comparative Analysis of Pre-Contractual Liability Under French, German, United Kingdom and United States Law”
  • Elspeth Faiman (JD), “The Montreal Protocol in US Domestic Law: A ‘Bottom Up’ Approach to the Development of Global Administrative Law”

Eighth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 22, 2011)

The Eighth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 22, 2011. The commentators were Professors Ryan Goodman, Smita Narula, and Margaret SatterthwaiteJayne Huckerby, and Jason Pobjoy.

The following student papers were presented:

  • Valerie Brender (JD ’12), Kiobel and Corporate Liability under the Alien Tort Statute —An Inquiry into Subjects of International Law
  • Kate Horner (MPA ’12), Women, Poverty, and Power: Assessing the Promise of the Human-Rights Based Approach
  • Emma Dunlop (LL.M ’11), Indications of Progress? Assessing the Reliance on Indicators in UNHCR Operations
  • Felix Lange (LL.M ’11), Legal Obligations on the Prevention of Genocide and War Crimes
  • Jeremy Shirm (LL.M ’11), Rhetorical Gridlock? U.N. Treaty Monitoring and Human Rights Protection

Seventh Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 9, 2010)

The Seventh Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 9, 2010. Faculty commentators were Professors Ryan Goodman and Smita Narula. CHRGJ Staff and Global Visitor commentators were Amna AkbarJayne HuckerbySarah KnuckeyVeerle OpgenhaffenZoe SalzmanLiz SepperHina Shamsi.

The following student papers were presented:

  • Niran Anketell, Genocide, Humanitarian Interventions, and the Exclusion of Slow, Rolling Genocides
  • Christine Chiu, Relief from Deportation for Foreign Nationals with HIV/AIDS
  • David Jacobson, The Right to Official State Recognition under the European Convention of Human Rights: Religionsgemeinschaft der Zeugen Jehovas v. Austria and the Status of New Religious Movements in Europe
  • April Gu, Conflicts between Economic Development and Human Rights: The One Child Policy as Case Study
  • Aristeidis I. Panou, GAL Norms and the Independence and Accountability of the ICC Prosecutor

Sixth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 10, 2009)

The Sixth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 10, 2009. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita Narula and Margaret Satterthwaite. CHRGJ Staff and Global Visitor commentators were Amna AkbarJayne HuckerbyVeerle OpgenhaffenSarah Knuckey, Mario Savino, Frank Upham and Nehal Bhuta. Other commentators included James Cockayne (International Peace Institute) and Brian Gorlick (UNHCR).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Roberta Berzero, Humanitarian Intervention, Responsibility to Protect and Transitional Justice: Squaring the Triangle
  • Christen Broecker, Undeserved Impunity: Foreign Sovereign Immunity as an Impediment to Effective International Corporate Accountability in U.S. Courts
  • Jeannie Rose Field, Bridging the Gap between Refugee Rights and Reality: A Proposal for Developing International Duties in the Refugee Context
  • Nelson Goh, Time or Manner: Resisting Prosecutorial Impulse in Transitional Societies for the ends of Peace and Justice
  • Amrita Kapur, Catch-22 in Post-Conflict Pluralist Africa: The Role of Development Institutions in Persuading Local Authorities to Apply and Enforce Gender Equality in Land Law
  • Ravi Mehta, The Lessons of Kadi: Reevaluating International Legal Ideology in Light of ‘Smart Sanctions’ Imposed on Individuals by the Security Council
  • Jennifer Wheeler, Reviving the Right to Associational Participation for the Improvement of Human Rights Indicators
  • Margarita O’Donnell, Rethinking the Role of National Sentencing Practice in the International Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda

Fifth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 3, 2008)

The Fifth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 3, 2008. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita Narula and Margaret Satterthwaite. CHRGJ Staff and Global Visitor commentators were William Abresch, Jayne HuckerbyVeerle OpgenhaffenSarah Knuckey, Conway Blake, Dr. Ludovich Hennebel and Dr. Amparo Martinez. Other commentators included Paige Aurther (ICTJ).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Julia Barry, Apostasy, Marriage, and Jurisdiction in Lina Joy: Where was CEDAW?
  • Alexis Blane, Analyzing the Use of the State Department Country Reports on Human Rights in the Context of Asylum Cases
  • Mitra Ebadolahi, The Case for a “Minimum Core Content” Concept As Applied to the ICESCR’s “International Assistance and Cooperation” Language
  • Rosalia Gitau, “God Willing, I will be back”: Gauging the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Capacity to Deter Economic Crimes in Liberia.
  • Jennifer Hainsfurther, A Rights-Based Approach: The Utilization of CEDAW to Protect the Human Rights of Migrant Workers
  • James Kirk, Navigating the Confluence of Human Rights and Environmental Protection: Difficulties Exposed by the Case of the Inuit
  • Alice Jaume, The Social Dimension of Globalization: which Level of Social Protection for which Link with Society? A Study of Acquisitive Residence and Access to Economic and Social Rights in the U.S.A. and in the E.U.
  • Amanda Klasing, Towards a Rights-Based Methodology: The Case of the Right to Water in Port-de-Paix Haiti

Fourth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (April 6, 2007)

The Fourth Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on April 6, 2007. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita NarulaMargaret Satterthwaite and Paul van Zyl. CHRGJ Staff and Global Visitor commentators were William Abresch and Jayne Huckerby. Other commentators included Angelina Fisher and Surabhi Ranganathan (IILJ), Doreen Lustig (J.S.D. Candidate, NYU School of Law), and Natalie Reid and Roy Schondorf (Debevoise & Plimpton LLP).

The following student papers were presented:

  • Roni Amit, Judicial Activism through International Law: From Security to Rights Supremacy in Israel’s High Court of Justice
  • Reena Arora, India’s Private Torture: Recasting State Responsibility in International Human Rights Law
  • Stephanie Barbour, The Blending of International Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law: The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
  • Christen Broecker, To End Impunity The Decline of Amnesty in Transitional Justice
  • Andrej Lang, Human Rights, Global Administrative Law, and the Role of Domestic Courts
  • Rahim Moloo, Looking Beyond Article 71: NGOs in the General Assembly and the Security Council?
  • Tafadzwa Pasipanodya, Rwandan Participants at the ICTR: For Them, With Them, or Despite Them
  • Liz Sepper, The Evolving Scope and Substance of CEDAW Article 5(a) in the Jurisprudence of the CEDAW Committee
  • Catherine Sweetser, Ensuring Accountability of UN Peacekeeping Personnel for Human Rights Violations

Third Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (March 31, 2006)

The Third Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on March 31, 2006. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita NarulaMargaret Satterthwaite and Paul van Zyl. CHRGJ Staff and Global Visitor commentators were Jayne Huckerby, Frank Haldemann, Julie Ringelheim, and Stephen Humphreys.

The following student papers were presented:

  • Andrew Hudson, Not a Great Asset: The U.N. Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Regime: Violating Human Rights
  • Shamiso Mbizvo, Reviving The Dream That is Rome Through Ad Hoc Judges At the International Criminal Court
  • Liliana Jubilut, Is the ‘responsibility to protect’ a real change in humanitarian intervention?
  • Gaylynn Burroughs, Discouraging Demand? Reconceptualizing Demand in the Context of Human Trafficking
  • Bill Van Esveld, The Administration of Justice in Refugee Camps

Second Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (March 4, 2005)

The Second Annual Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference was held on March 4, 2005. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita NarulaMargaret Satterthwaite and Paul van Zyl. The following student papers were presented:

  • Joanna Pozen The Non-Disclosure of Witnesses’ Identities in the Rwanda Trials: Failure to Recognize Cultural Differences in International Tribunals
  • Katrina Gustafson Joint Criminal Enterprise Liability: The Link Between the Accused and the Principal Perpetrators of International Crimes
  • James Cockayne Toward a ‘First Principles’ Approach to the Accountability of Private Military Contractors
  • Adrian di Giovanni The ICC’s First Steps: Uganda, Prosecution and Mato Oput
  • Ruben Carranza Plunder and Pain: Should Large-Scale Corruption be Addressed by Transitional Justice?
  • Kevin Arlyck Competing Demands: Trials as a Response to the Holocaust in Contemporary France
  • William Abresch A Framework for the Judicial Review of Amnesties and Transitional Justice Programs Under the American Convention on Human Rights

Inaugural Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference (October 31, 2003)

The Center held its inaugural Emerging Human Rights Scholarship Conference on October 31, 2003. Faculty commentators were Professors Philip AlstonSmita Narula and Margaret Satterthwaite. The following student papers were presented:

  • Mark Toufayan, Return to Communitarianism? Implications for the Duty to Prevent Genocide for States and the United Nations
  • James Cockayne, Human Rights Violations in Iraq: Holding the Occupiers Accountable
  • Peter Gutherie, The Trafficking Victims Protection Act: American Exceptionalism or Collaboration?
  • John Esmerado, Crossing the Great Divide: The Marginal Embrace of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by State and Federal Courts in the United States
  • Patricia S. Mann, Just Individuals with Rights?
  • Aaron Dhir, A Critical Analysis of the Proposed Disability Rights Convention and the Application of International Human Rights Norms to Persons with Mental Disabilities
  • Chitra Aiyar, The Ongoing Struggle Against Caste Discrimination: Some Observations from Tamil Nadu
  • Janet Hostetler, Grassroots Activism and the Evolution of and Compliance with International Human Rights Law